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27.03.17 Rawlins and Piddini lab pinpoint role of FGFR2 in adult airway homeostasis

last modified Mar 31, 2017 12:31 PM
In this Development article, two collaborating research groups at the Gurdon Institute show that signalling through FGF receptor 2 is required for airway homeostasis
27.03.17 Rawlins and Piddini lab pinpoint role of FGFR2 in adult airway homeostasis

Extract from Fig. 3C: Fgfr2 mutant basal cells growing in 2D culture.

FGFR2 is required for airway basal cell self-renewal and terminal differentiation

Balasooriya G, Goschorska M, Piddini E, Rawlins EL. (2017) Development pii: dev.135681. doi: 10.1242/dev.135681. [Epub ahead of print]

 

Summary from the paper

Airway stem cells slowly self-renew and produce differentiated progeny to maintain homeostasis throughout the life-span of an individual. Mutations in the molecular regulators of these processes may drive cancer or degenerative disease, but are also potential therapeutic targets. Conditionally deleting one copy of FGF Receptor 2 in adult mouse airway basal cells results in self-renewal and differentiation phenotypes. We show that FGFR2 signalling correlates with maintenance of expression of a key transcription factor for basal cell self- renewal and differentiation, SOX2. This heterozygous phenotype illustrates that subtle changes in Receptor Tyrosine Kinase signalling can have significant effects, perhaps providing an explanation for the numerous changes seen in cancer.

 

 

Summary and figure image from the paper reproduced under Creative Commons Attribution License 3.0

 

Read more about research in the Rawlins and Piddini labs.

Studying development to understand disease

The Gurdon Institute is funded by the Wellcome Trust and Cancer Research UK to study the biology of development, and how normal growth and maintenance go wrong in cancer and other diseases.

 

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