skip to primary navigationskip to content
 

11.07.16 Molecular duo of Patronin and Shot are crucial for polarising microtubules, find St Johnston lab

last modified Aug 23, 2016 10:39 AM
A new protein complex, Patronin and Shot, is found to support the organisation of microtubules that lead to cell polarisation
11.07.16 Molecular duo of Patronin and Shot are crucial for polarising microtubules, find St Johnston lab

Active Patronin cortical noncentrosomal microtubule organising centres.

Patronin/Shot Cortical Foci Assemble the Noncentrosomal Microtubule Array that Specifies the Drosophila Anterior-Posterior Axis.

Nashchekin D, Fernandes AR, St Johnston D. (2016) Developmental Cell 38(1): 61-72.

Summary from paper

Noncentrosomal microtubules play an important role in polarizing differentiated cells, but little is known about how these microtubules are organized.

Here we identify the spectraplakin, Short stop (Shot), as the cortical anchor for noncentrosomal microtubule organizing centers (ncMTOCs) in the Drosophila oocyte. Shot interacts with the cortex through its actin-binding domain and recruits the microtubule minus-end-binding protein, Patronin, to form cortical ncMTOCs.

Shot/Patronin foci do not co-localize with γ-tubulin, suggesting that they do not nucleate new microtubules. Instead, they capture and stabilize existing microtubule minus ends, which then template new microtubule growth. Shot/Patronin foci are excluded from the oocyte posterior by the Par-1 polarity kinase to generate the polarized microtubule network that localizes axis determinants. Both proteins also accumulate apically in epithelial cells, where they are required for the formation of apical-basal microtubule arrays.

Thus, Shot/Patronin ncMTOCs may provide a general mechanism for organizing noncentrosomal microtubules in differentiated cells.

 

 

 

Summary reproduced under Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0).

 

Studying development to understand disease

The Gurdon Institute is funded by the Wellcome Trust and Cancer Research UK to study the biology of development, and how normal growth and maintenance go wrong in cancer and other diseases.