skip to primary navigationskip to content

Data protection - Communications

Data protection statement for Gurdon Institute communications activities.

Revised 19.12.17 to comply with incoming General Data Protection Regulations.

This statement explains how the Wellcome Trust/ Cancer Research UK Gurdon Institute handles and uses data it collects about its current staff, alumni, collaborators and other contacts, to support communications activities.

For more information about how we handle your personal information, and your rights under data protection legislation, please see our Privacy and Data Protection policy page.

 

Purpose of personal data use

Current staff

In order to keep a record of staff roles and impacts, and to link research projects and researchers with outputs and impacts, the Gurdon Institute needs up-to-date records of current staff names and roles. We will provide news to staff internally as well as compile anonymised, aggregated statistics for external communications.

Alumni

We are proud of our alumni and want to stay in touch. The Gurdon Institute endeavours to keep in touch with all its research alumni with the aim of providing services such as news updates, publications (such as the Prospectus/Annual report), job adverts, invitations to events, and for developing relationships with donors.

Collaborators, funders and friends

The Gurdon Institute wishes to maintain contact with, and promote itself to, a number of target audiences among current and previous funders, scientific advisors, collaborators, communications contacts and friends.  We will provide services such as news updates, publications, job adverts and invitations to events. 

 

The opt-in records are used by the Gurdon Institute to support internal and external communications activities such as: promotion of the Institute via the website, social media and publications, organising events, advertising jobs, research impact monitoring and reporting, equality reviews, alumni relations and fundraising purposes.

Communications may be sent by post, telephone or electronic means.

 

Categories and sources of personal data

Most records contain, at a minimum: name, title, current job, contact details at job location (or an alternative location), approximate dates of membership as Gurdon Institute lab or core staff, and career and other achievements relevant to our relationship with you. None of these items is classified as ‘sensitive information’ and all except the dates of your Gurdon Institute membership have been collected from online, reputable, public sources, or have come directly from you.

Data sharing and international transfers

All information is held securely. We will not share our records with others except where essential for carrying out our communication or event activities (e.g. providing a mailing list spreadsheet to a UK-based mailing house for sending out the Prospectus/ Annual report).

There is no statutory or contractual need for you to supply us with personal data.

No automated decisions are taken based on the personal data.

 

If you have any queries, wish to restrict data processing or sharing, do not want to be contacted by the Gurdon Institute, or wish to have your personal data removed from our communications database, please inform us.

Otherwise, we will maintain your record in support of your life-long relationship with the Institute.

Note: If you are a Cambridge University employee and/or College member, you will need to contact CUDAR and the College separately if you wish to restrict data processing, sharing, marketing or contact by them.

Studying development to understand disease

The Gurdon Institute is funded by Wellcome and Cancer Research UK to study the biology of development, and how normal growth and maintenance go wrong in cancer and other diseases.

combinedLogo x3 trans2018

 

Share this

Mature sperm small-RNA profile in the sparrow: implications for transgenerational effects of age on fitness

Single-cell transcriptome analyses reveal novel targets modulating cardiac neovascularization by resident endothelial cells following myocardial infarction

Derivation and maintenance of mouse haploid embryonic stem cells

Establishment of porcine and human expanded potential stem cells

Adapting machine-learning algorithms to design gene circuits

Lgr5+ stem/progenitor cells reside at the apex of a heterogeneous embryonic hepatoblast pool

Identification of a regeneration-organizing cell in the Xenopus tail

Citrullination of HP1γ chromodomain affects association with chromatin

A critical but divergent role of PRDM14 in human primordial germ cell fate revealed by inducible degrons

A transmissible RNA pathway in honey bees

METTL1 Promotes let-7 MicroRNA Processing via m7G Methylation

A Secreted RNA Binding Protein Forms RNA-Stabilizing Granules in the Honeybee Royal Jelly

The Human Lung Cell Atlas - A high-resolution reference map of the human lung in health and disease

A Compendium of Mutational Signatures of Environmental Agents

Characteristics and homogeneity of N6-methylation in human genomes

Comparative Epigenomics Reveals that RNA Polymerase II Pausing and Chromatin Domain Organization Control Nematode piRNA Biogenesis

Pluripotency and X chromosome dynamics revealed in pig pre-gastrulating embryos by single cell analysis

Dorsal-ventral differences in neural stem cell quiescence are induced by p57KIP2/Dacapo

Crypt fusion as a homeostatic mechanism in the human colon

Link to full list on PubMed