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Data protection - Communications

Data protection statement for Gurdon Institute communications activities.

Revised 19.12.17 to comply with incoming General Data Protection Regulations.

This statement explains how the Wellcome Trust/ Cancer Research UK Gurdon Institute handles and uses data it collects about its current staff, alumni, collaborators and other contacts, to support communications activities.

For more information about how we handle your personal information, and your rights under data protection legislation, please see our Privacy and Data Protection policy page.

 

Purpose of personal data use

Current staff

In order to keep a record of staff roles and impacts, and to link research projects and researchers with outputs and impacts, the Gurdon Institute needs up-to-date records of current staff names and roles. We will provide news to staff internally as well as compile anonymised, aggregated statistics for external communications.

Alumni

We are proud of our alumni and want to stay in touch. The Gurdon Institute endeavours to keep in touch with all its research alumni with the aim of providing services such as news updates, publications (such as the Prospectus/Annual report), job adverts, invitations to events, and for developing relationships with donors.

Collaborators, funders and friends

The Gurdon Institute wishes to maintain contact with, and promote itself to, a number of target audiences among current and previous funders, scientific advisors, collaborators, communications contacts and friends.  We will provide services such as news updates, publications, job adverts and invitations to events. 

 

The opt-in records are used by the Gurdon Institute to support internal and external communications activities such as: promotion of the Institute via the website, social media and publications, organising events, advertising jobs, research impact monitoring and reporting, equality reviews, alumni relations and fundraising purposes.

Communications may be sent by post, telephone or electronic means.

 

Categories and sources of personal data

Most records contain, at a minimum: name, title, current job, contact details at job location (or an alternative location), approximate dates of membership as Gurdon Institute lab or core staff, and career and other achievements relevant to our relationship with you. None of these items is classified as ‘sensitive information’ and all except the dates of your Gurdon Institute membership have been collected from online, reputable, public sources, or have come directly from you.

Data sharing and international transfers

All information is held securely. We will not share our records with others except where essential for carrying out our communication or event activities (e.g. providing a mailing list spreadsheet to a UK-based mailing house for sending out the Prospectus/ Annual report).

There is no statutory or contractual need for you to supply us with personal data.

No automated decisions are taken based on the personal data.

 

If you have any queries, wish to restrict data processing or sharing, do not want to be contacted by the Gurdon Institute, or wish to have your personal data removed from our communications database, please inform us.

Otherwise, we will maintain your record in support of your life-long relationship with the Institute.

Note: If you are a Cambridge University employee and/or College member, you will need to contact CUDAR and the College separately if you wish to restrict data processing, sharing, marketing or contact by them.

Studying development to understand disease

The Gurdon Institute is funded by Wellcome and Cancer Research UK to study the biology of development, and how normal growth and maintenance go wrong in cancer and other diseases.

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Extracellular Forms of Aβ and Tau from iPSC Models of Alzheimer's Disease Disrupt Synaptic Plasticity

Combinational Treatment of Trichostatin A and Vitamin C Improves the Efficiency of Cloning Mice by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

Predominant Asymmetrical Stem Cell Fate Outcome Limits the Rate of Niche Succession in Human Colonic Crypts

G9a regulates temporal preimplantation developmental program and lineage segregation in blastocyst

Validating the concept of mutational signatures with isogenic cell models

A PAX5-OCT4-PRDM1 developmental switch specifies human primordial germ cells

Targeting NAT10 enhances healthspan and lifespan in a mouse model of human accelerated aging syndrome

An alternative mode of epithelial polarity in the Drosophila midgut

Detection of functional protein domains by unbiased genome-wide forward genetic screening

Fank1 and Jazf1 promote multiciliated cell differentiation in the mouse airway epithelium

Genome organization at different scales: nature, formation and function

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Link to full list on PubMed