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Studentships at the Gurdon Institute

Come and do your PhD at the world-leading Gurdon Institute

 

General information on applying to do your PhD at the Gurdon Institute:

Prospective PhD students are advised to apply to the appropriate course/Department towards the end of the calendar year preceding the October in which they hope to start, well before the funding deadlines in early December.

We welcome enquiries from prospective graduate students. We have a thriving population of graduates who contribute greatly to both the stimulating research environment and the life of the Institute as a whole. Graduates also become members of the University biological or medical sciences department to which their group leader is affiliated.

Graduate studentships are supported from various public and private sources. The Wellcome Trust finances a number of schemes in the University, including one in Developmental Mechanisms and one in stem cells. The CRUK Cambridge Centre also provides studentships.  Current calls are listed above - there are none right now and the typical point in the year is Autumn/Winter for entry the following October.

Most studentships are administered through Departments where our group leaders are affiliated, even though their labs are entirely within the Gurdon Institute. Prospective students must quote the correct Department on their application form.

Applicants can at the same time write to the group leader they wish to join (get in touch by email at contact@gurdon.cam.ac.uk stating group leader of interest) with their CV and names of 2-3 referees. (Privacy and Data Protection policy)

Further information on the application process, with course directories and funding database, can be found on the University's Graduate Admissions website.

Departmental affiliations:

  • Julie Ahringer, Genetics
  • Andrea Brand, Physiology, Development and Neuroscience
  • Jenny Gallop, Biochemistry
  • John Gurdon, Zoology
  • Meri Huch, Physiology, Development and Neuroscience
  • Steve Jackson, Biochemistry 
  • Tony Kouzarides, Pathology
  • Hansong Ma, Genetics
  • Eric Miska, Genetics 
  • Emma Rawlins, Pathology
  • Daniel St Johnston, Genetics
  • Azim Surani, Physiology, Development and Neuroscience 
  • Phil Zegerman, Biochemistry

Studying development to understand disease

The Gurdon Institute is funded by Wellcome and Cancer Research UK to study the biology of development, and how normal growth and maintenance go wrong in cancer and other diseases.

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Defining the Identity and Dynamics of Adult Gastric Isthmus Stem Cells

Disease modelling in human organoids

The role of integrins in Drosophila egg chamber morphogenesis

Tracing the cellular dynamics of sebaceous gland development in normal and perturbed states

Neural stem cell dynamics: the development of brain tumours

Liver organoids: from basic research to therapeutic applications

NSUN2 introduces 5-methylcytosines in mammalian mitochondrial tRNAs

The roles of DNA, RNA and histone methylation in ageing and cancer

Separating Golgi proteins from cis to trans reveals underlying properties of cisternal localization

Sequencing cell-type-specific transcriptomes with SLAM-ITseq

Mature sperm small-RNA profile in the sparrow: implications for transgenerational effects of age on fitness

Single-cell transcriptome analyses reveal novel targets modulating cardiac neovascularization by resident endothelial cells following myocardial infarction

Derivation and maintenance of mouse haploid embryonic stem cells

Establishment of porcine and human expanded potential stem cells

Adapting machine-learning algorithms to design gene circuits

Lgr5+ stem/progenitor cells reside at the apex of a heterogeneous embryonic hepatoblast pool

Identification of a regeneration-organizing cell in the Xenopus tail

Citrullination of HP1γ chromodomain affects association with chromatin

A critical but divergent role of PRDM14 in human primordial germ cell fate revealed by inducible degrons

A transmissible RNA pathway in honey bees

METTL1 Promotes let-7 MicroRNA Processing via m7G Methylation 

Link to full list on PubMed