skip to primary navigationskip to content
 

20.01.16 Steve Jackson wins 2016 King Faisal International Prize

last modified Jan 20, 2016 06:34 PM
The prestigious King Faisal International Prize for Science has been won jointly by the Gurdon Institute's Steve Jackson and Harvard Medical School's Vamsi Krishna Mootha
20.01.16 Steve Jackson wins 2016 King Faisal International Prize

Prof Steve Jackson, FRS FMedSci

Prof Steve Jackson is recognised for "his outstanding contribution to defining the link between the basic mechanism of genomic DNA instability and its relationship to cancer. Specifically, he unraveled the salient components of the pathway involved in DNA repair. He is also credited with an innovative approach to bring his findings into tangible therapeutic products to treat cancer".

On hearing the news, Jackson said "It is a great honour to receive the 2016 King Faisal International Prize for Science. I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the many dedicated, innovative and highly talented people who have worked in my laboratory over the years, as it is their groundbreaking science that led to me receiving this award."

Prof Vamsi Krishna Mootha is jointly awarded for his "use of the mitochondrion (the cellular power plant) as a model to identify the link between pivotal molecular factors involved in mitochondrial dysfunction and major human diseases such as diabetes and other metabolic disorders". 

The prize includes: 

  • a certificate written in Arabic calligraphy, describing the work for which the winner is awarded the prize
  • a commemorative 24-carat, 200g gold medallion
  • $200,000 (shared between co-winners). 

Jackson will receive the award in an official ceremony to be held in Riyadh in March 2016, under the patronage of the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman Ibn Abdul Aziz, King of Saudi Arabia.

The King Faisal International Prize is awarded annually in five disciplines: Science, Medicine, Service to Islam, Islamic Studies, and Arabic Language and Literature. It is given by the Riyadh, Saudi Arabia-based King Faisal Foundation, a philanthropic organisation established in 1976 by the sons and daughters of the late King Faisal bin Abdulaziz in commemoration of their father.  Nominations for the prize are peer reviewed, and an international selection committee meets at the Foundation's headquarters to choose the winners. The science prize was first awarded in 1984; the most recent winner in the field of biology was Prof. Alexander J. Varchavsky of CalTech, in 2012.

 

More about Steve Jackson's research.

More about the King Faisal International Prize.

Studying development to understand disease

The Gurdon Institute is funded by Wellcome and Cancer Research UK to study the biology of development, and how normal growth and maintenance go wrong in cancer and other diseases.

combinedLogo x3 trans2018

 

Share this

A walk through tau therapeutic strategies

Labeling strategies matter for super-resolution microscopy: a comparison between HaloTags and SNAP-tags

Stem Cell-Derived Human Gametes: The Public Engagement Imperative

Tissue- and sex-specific small RNAomes reveal sex differences in response to the environment

Comparative Epigenomics Reveals that RNA Polymerase II Pausing and Chromatin Domain Organization Control Nematode piRNA Biogenesis

Pluripotency and X chromosome dynamics revealed in pig pre-gastrulating embryos by single cell analysis

Constrained actin dynamics emerges from variable compositions of actin regulatory protein complexes

Microtubules Deform the Nuclear Membrane and Disrupt Nucleocytoplasmic Transport in Tau-Mediated Frontotemporal Dementia

Drosophila IMP regulates Kuzbanian to control the timing of Notch signalling in the follicle cells

Challenges in unsupervised clustering of single-cell RNA-seq data

Engineering vasculature: Architectural effects on microcapillary-like structure self-assembly

ATM orchestrates the DNA-damage response to counter toxic non-homologous end-joining at broken replication forks

Altered γ-Secretase Processing of APP Disrupts Lysosome and Autophagosome Function in Monogenic Alzheimer’s Disease

Helicase subunit Cdc45 targets the checkpoint kinase Rad53 to both replication initiation and elongation complexes after fork stalling

Competition for Mitogens Regulates Spermatogenic Stem Cell Homeostasis in an Open Niche

Link to full list on PubMed