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05.01.21 An extended role for the 'S-phase checkpoint' in regulating DNA replication

last modified Jan 06, 2021 01:30 PM
This Elife publication by Johnson et al. redefines the scope of the 'S-phase checkpoint' with implications for understanding checkpoint function in cancers that lack cell cycle controls.
05.01.21 An extended role for the 'S-phase checkpoint' in regulating DNA replication

Checkpoint can operate at several phases of cell cycle

Checkpoint inhibition of origin firing prevents inappropriate replication outside of S-phase

 

Johnson M et al. (2021) eLife 10:e63589

DOI: 10.7554/eLife.63589

 

Abstract from the paper

Checkpoints maintain the order of cell cycle events during DNA damage or incomplete replication. How the checkpoint response is tailored to different phases of the cell cycle remains poorly understood. The S-phase checkpoint for example results in the slowing of replication, which in budding yeast occurs by Rad53-dependent inhibition of the initiation factors Sld3 and Dbf4.

Despite this, we show here that Rad53 phosphorylates both of these substrates throughout the cell cycle at the same sites as in S-phase, suggesting roles for this pathway beyond S-phase. Indeed, we show that Rad53-dependent inhibition of Sld3 and Dbf4 limits re-replication in G2/M, preventing gene amplification. In addition, we show that inhibition of Sld3 and Dbf4 in G1 prevents premature initiation at all origins at the G1/S transition.

This study redefines the scope of the 'S-phase checkpoint' with implications for understanding checkpoint function in cancers that lack cell cycle controls.

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